25 August 2015

 

In researching air fares, bus fares, accommodation and everything else that goes with travel you realise there is nothing standard about being a child, so it may seem futile to be writing about it.  However it is something valuable to know especially if you are in the budgeting phase of your journey.  There will be other 'hidden' costs, or those totally foreign to you, that being exact with what you can, will help rein in any contingency blow-out.

 

So here are a few GUIDELINES:

Airlines generally charge full fare at 12 years of age, discounted between 2 and 12, and free if under 2 and the child can be accommodated on a parent's lap.

In New Zealand 16 years old is the age most companies charge as an adult.  Family tickets are 2 adults and 2 children only.  Under fives (pre-schoolers) are mostly free.

Austria is über cool, allowing child prices under 19 years of age (ie from 0 - 18 inclusive).  

Belgium looks upon children under 6 as free, and children under 18 as portioned.

Iceland generally designates children to be under 6 if making a distinction at all, and doesn't allow family tickets - you pay for each person.

Germany are great for their family tickets, normally without limit on the number of children that are included and often allowing for these to be grand-children as well (German Rail).  Although the age in many commercial institutions is under 14 or 16 years, children can get the same concession up to 18 years and/or if they carry a student ID (even in tertiary).  There are also concessions for the disabled and those over 65 years old.

 

HOW TO STRETCH YOUR BUDGET:

  • Plan meticulously!
  • Do free activities and attend free events.  Often museums will have a free day per week or month.
  • Check online prices, as these may be slightly cheaper than in-person ones.  
  • Winter usually costs less than summer, if attractions and accommodations are still open - you will then need to check the specific dates that dictate the season.
  • Cook your own meals.
  • Book your airfare approximately 60 days prior to travel for the best rates.
  • Think about renting an apartment or staying in hostels to get longer-term discounts.
  • Use public transport and look for day/week or group travel discounts.
  • See whether buying a vehicle is more economical than renting (note though insurances, registration, plates, and ongoing variable costs like fuel etc).
  • If travelling in summer only, consider camping or buying a second-hand caravan or motorhome.  Camping grounds may charge per person or per unit.  Many are closed for winter
04 August 2015

Southern Germany to Denmark via Berlin

Images courtesy of Google

 

Planning exactly where to go is not a science at all.  It is a mixture of heart and mind, and finding a balance between the two.

The countries we want to visit are just the big picture and it is up to me to design our itinerary to satisfy more than the 'stamp in the passport' mentality of visiting a new land (and in Europe where there are no internal borders, stamps are a bit of a thing of the past anyway).  Let me take you through the beautiful but messy process that is planning an overseas experience (O.E.).

 

THE WHERE

First Atlas and I prioritised our country wish lists.  You will notice when doing this exercise for yourself that some decisions you make are based on what you know or do not know about a place; othertimes it's how you feel that wins over.  Comparing fact vs feeling is like comparing apples to oranges but it can be done! Surprisingly the first group of 6 (out of 18 destinations) were the same with only 1 difference.  Germany is of course our number 1, but with the potential to stay another 3 months and travel after that, these other countries are our next focus: Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, Iceland, Belgium & Greece.  

 

THE WHAT

Next I asked each person what they do or might enjoy doing or seeing in a new place.  I wrote about those in our What we'll see and do in Tuebingen post.

The challenge is to find what opportunities exist in each place, not doing too much, and how it might work to get there.

 

THE HOW

Google maps is a real boon to route planning and moreso when you discover that there is an 'avoid tolls' option that you can select when travelling by road.

 

Another tip is instead of entering a broad start and finish location and dragging the route to the places you really want to travel through on the way, use their '+' feature.  Start with your beginning location, add the next one, then press the '+' to add another etc. [Note: it only allows for 10 points.]

 

 

To a certain extent you may also need to consider the time of year you will be visiting.  For us, this applied especially to Iceland, as Atlas wants to see the Northern Lights and they are only visible in the (northern) Autumn and Winter months.  Sadly not being there in Summer means not seeing the Puffins and Reindeer though.  That is something I figured early on:

We are not going to be able to see & do everything; we are not going to ever have the perfect itinerary; we will miss some things BUT we will have experienced something, and experienced it together! 

 

THE WHY

Yes, for us it's primarily experiencing something together.  Parts of our journey are because I want to share something of the past with the family, or conversely try something altogether new; others are because a tourist attraction is in a specific town; one country is for family heritage, others as our foreign 'son' or 'daughter' lives there.  There is no wrong or right reason to go somewhere or do something.

 

In all this complex inexactness of designing our trip I found that it is neither what, where, how or why that consistently trumps the others.  Each takes a turn as the raison d'etre, and that's okay.

You are not going to be scored out of 100 for your personal planning prowess.

25 December 2013

A special night out stopping by the Christmas lights

 

Here are the sentiments of the season from each of the places currently on our wish list (as best as we could find).

 

Andorra (Catalan)
Bon Nadal!
 
Belgium (Dutch, French & German)
See Netherlands, France & Germany
 
Bulgaria (Bulgarian)
Tchestito Rojdestvo Hristovo
Честита Коледа (Čestita Koleda)
Весела Коледа (Vesela Koleda)
 
Denmark (Danish)
Glædelig jul!
 
England (English)
Merry Christmas
 
France (French)
Joyeux Noel
 
Germany (German)
Fröhliche Weihnachten!
 
Greece (Greek)
Kala Christouyenna
 
Iceland (Icelandic)
Gledileg Jol
 
Ireland (Irish)
Nollaig Shona Dhuit
 
Italy (Italian)
Buon Natale or Buone Feste Natalizie
 
Morroco (Arabic, Tamazight)
Milad Majid
أجمل التهاني بمناسبة الميلاد و حلول السنة الجديدة
(ajmil at-tihānī bimunāsabah al-mīlād wa ḥilūl as-sanah al-jadīdah)
 
Netherlands (Dutch)
Vrolijk Kerstfeest
Prettige kerstdagen
Zalig kerstfeest
 
Phillipines (Filipino)
Maligayang pasko!
 
Portugal (Portuguese)
Feliz Natal
 
Sweden (Swedish)
God Jul
 
Singapore (English, Malay, Tamil, Mandarin)
See England
Selamat Hari Natal (Malay)
கிறிஸ்துமஸ் மற்றும் இனிய புத்தாண்டு வாழ்த்துக்கள் (Tamil)
(Christmas matrum puthaandu vaazthukkal)
聖誕快樂 新年快樂 [圣诞快乐 新年快乐] (Mandarin)
(shèngdàn kuàilè xīnnián kuàilè)
 
Spain (Spanish)
¡Feliz Navidad!
 
Switzerland (French, Italian, German, Romansh; Swiss German)
See France, Italy, Germany
Legreivlas fiastas da Nadal! (Romansh)
Schöni Fäschttäg / Schöni Wienachte (Swiss German)
 
Thailand (Thai)
Sawat Dee Wan Kritsamas
sà-wàt-dee bpee mài (Sawadee Pee Mai)
 
Turkey (Turkish)
Noeliniz Ve
iyi Noeller
 
USA (American English)
Happy Holidays | Merry Christmas
 
Venezuela (Spanish)
Feliz Navidad